Doctorate of Philosophy – Biblical Archaeology II

$99.00

By the end of Biblical Archaeology II, students will have acquired a nuanced understanding of the archaeological methods and historical contexts surrounding these significant discoveries, enriching their appreciation of the intertwined narratives of ancient civilizations and biblical events. This course invites students to engage critically with primary sources, fostering a deeper connection to the ancient world and the enduring legacy of its material culture.

Description

Course Description:

Biblical Archaeology II delves into the fascinating world of ancient discoveries, shedding light on pivotal artifacts that have shaped our understanding of biblical history and the ancient Near East. Building upon the foundations laid in Biblical Archaeology I, this course explores a diverse range of archaeological finds, unlocking the mysteries of civilizations through the examination of artifacts such as the Rosetta Stone, the Behistun Inscription, the Moabite Stone, the Code of Hammurabi, the city of Ur, the Nuzi Tablets, the Mari Letters, and the Dead Sea Scrolls.

Students will embark on a captivating journey through time, tracing the evolution of cultures and civilizations that have left an indelible mark on the landscape of biblical history. The course emphasizes the interdisciplinary nature of biblical archaeology, integrating insights from anthropology, history, linguistics, and theology to provide a comprehensive understanding of the significance of these archaeological treasures.

Key Topics Include:

The Rosetta Stone: Unravel the secrets of this crucial artifact that played a pivotal role in deciphering ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs.

The Behistun Inscription: Explore the multilingual inscription that proved instrumental in unlocking the cuneiform script and understanding the ancient Persian Empire.

The Moabite Stone: Examine the monumental stele that preserves the historical account of the Moabite king Mesha and his conflicts with the Israelites.

The Code of Hammurabi: Analyze one of the earliest and most complete written legal codes, offering insights into Babylonian society and law.

The City of Ur: Investigate the archaeological remains of this ancient Sumerian city, shedding light on the cultural and religious practices of its inhabitants.

The Nuzi Tablets: Delve into the legal, social, and economic aspects of ancient Mesopotamia through the examination of these legal documents from the city of Nuzi.

The Mari Letters: Explore the royal correspondence from the ancient city of Mari, providing a glimpse into the political and diplomatic landscape of the region.

The Dead Sea Scrolls: Uncover the significance of these ancient Jewish texts, examining their impact on our understanding of biblical texts and the history of Judaism.

By the end of Biblical Archaeology II, students will have acquired a nuanced understanding of the archaeological methods and historical contexts surrounding these significant discoveries, enriching their appreciation of the intertwined narratives of ancient civilizations and biblical events. This course invites students to engage critically with primary sources, fostering a deeper connection to the ancient world and the enduring legacy of its material culture.

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